When it comes to social media influencers, it is quality and not quantity that increasingly matters.  Influencers are social media users who have the power to affect purchase decisions of others because of their authority, knowledge, position or relationship with their audience, according to a Denmark-based marketing platform, Influencer Marketing Hub. From cooking recipes to make up tips, they use platforms like Instagram and YouTube to share engaging content.  While influencers are becoming an indispensable part of a brand’s marketing metrics, those with organic and smaller sets of followers are the ones that attract attention, says a survey report by the New Delhi-based influencer marketing platform Zefmo Media. Up to 65% of the marketers or strategists surveyed said authenticity is more important than the number of followers, the report says.  Sign up for the Quartz Obsession email Enter your email Sign me up  Stay updated about Quartz products and events. Thanks for being a loyal reader. You’ve hit your monthly article limit. Become a member to continue reading and support our journalism. Unlock unlimited access to Quartz, including member-exclusive coverage, events, and access to our journalists.  Start free trial
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When it comes to social media influencers, it is quality and not quantity that increasingly matters. Influencers are social media users who have the power to affect purchase decisions of others because of their authority, knowledge, position or relationship with their audience, according to a Denmark-based marketing platform, Influencer Marketing Hub. From cooking recipes to make up tips, they use platforms like Instagram and YouTube to share engaging content. While influencers are becoming an indispensable part of a brand’s marketing metrics, those with organic and smaller sets of followers are the ones that attract attention, says a survey report by the New Delhi-based influencer marketing platform Zefmo Media. Up to 65% of the marketers or strategists surveyed said authenticity is more important than the number of followers, the report says. Sign up for the Quartz Obsession email Enter your email Sign me up Stay updated about Quartz products and events. Thanks for being a loyal reader. You’ve hit your monthly article limit. Become a member to continue reading and support our journalism. Unlock unlimited access to Quartz, including member-exclusive coverage, events, and access to our journalists. Start free trial

H-4 visa-holders are fed up with the US government. A lawsuit filed in a US district court by four H-4 employment authorisation …
The Himalayas were scattered with tragedy this summer. Eleven climbers died on Mount Everest, many of them forced to wait for hours in the “death zone,” the region beyond 8,000 metres (26,246 feet) above sea level. Surreal pictures of a “traffic jam” on Everest flooded the media—a long queue of climbers clinging to a rope, waiting for their turn at the top.  Climbers spoke of having to step over bodies, of watching other delirious climbers being borne down as they made their way up. The torrent of adventurers has ensured that there is no such thing as a lonely death on the Everest anymore. Recovery operations have yielded four bodies and 11 tonnes of garbage so far.  The other tragedy occurred far from the public eye, in one of the last remote fastnesses of the world. Eight climbers went missing on Uttarakhand’s Nanda Devi, the highest peak in India. The group had permission to climb the Nanda Devi East peak. Days later, five bodies were spotted on an unscaled peak nearby.  Sign up for the Quartz Obsession email Enter your email Sign me up  Stay updated about Quartz products and events. Thanks for being a loyal reader. You’ve hit your monthly article limit. Become a member to continue reading and support our journalism. Unlock unlimited access to Quartz, including member-exclusive coverage, events, and access to our journalists.  Start free trial Log in
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The Himalayas were scattered with tragedy this summer. Eleven climbers died on Mount Everest, many of them forced to wait for hours in the “death zone,” the region beyond 8,000 metres (26,246 feet) above sea level. Surreal pictures of a “traffic jam” on Everest flooded the media—a long queue of climbers clinging to a rope, waiting for their turn at the top. Climbers spoke of having to step over bodies, of watching other delirious climbers being borne down as they made their way up. The torrent of adventurers has ensured that there is no such thing as a lonely death on the Everest anymore. Recovery operations have yielded four bodies and 11 tonnes of garbage so far. The other tragedy occurred far from the public eye, in one of the last remote fastnesses of the world. Eight climbers went missing on Uttarakhand’s Nanda Devi, the highest peak in India. The group had permission to climb the Nanda Devi East peak. Days later, five bodies were spotted on an unscaled peak nearby. Sign up for the Quartz Obsession email Enter your email Sign me up Stay updated about Quartz products and events. Thanks for being a loyal reader. You’ve hit your monthly article limit. Become a member to continue reading and support our journalism. Unlock unlimited access to Quartz, including member-exclusive coverage, events, and access to our journalists. Start free trial Log in

hey’re talking about a revolution in the tax world. At a Tokyo summit this weekend, G20 finance ministers are expected …