NATIONAL INTEREST? Tigers in a southern reserve are victims of India’s aggressive push towards nuclear energy By Mayank AggarwalJuly 15, 2019 The quest for uranium deposits to meet India’s nuclear power goals has now reached a tiger reserve in Telangana. An expert panel on forests of the ministry of environment, forest and climate change has recommended in-principle approval for a proposal by the central government’s department of atomic energy (DAE) for survey and exploration of uranium over 83 square kilometres in Telangana’s Amrabad Tiger Reserve.  The proposal was considered by the forest advisory committee in its meeting on May 22. As per the minutes of the meeting, even though the committee noted that there are deficiencies in the proposal, it recommended the project for in-principle approval considering that the project is of “critical importance from [the] national perspective.”  However, the forest advisory committee stipulated that the approval is subject to the submission of all required documents and said that after “receipt of the same, the complete proposal may be placed before the competent authority for approval.” Following this, the ministry of forest’s deputy inspector general of forests Naresh Kumar wrote to the Telangana government on June 19 requesting it to “submit the proposal along with verified relevant documents,” for identified boreholes for further consideration by the environment ministry.  Sign up for the Quartz Daily Brief email Enter your email Sign me up  Stay updated about Quartz products and events. Thanks for supporting our journalism! You’ve hit your monthly article limit. Become a member to help build the future of Quartz. Get unlimited access to Quartz on all devices. Unlock member-exclusive coverage, CEO interviews, member-only events, conference calls with our editors, and more.  Start free trial Log in Membership will also get you:   Exclusive videos that show you how the world is changing faster than ever before
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NATIONAL INTEREST? Tigers in a southern reserve are victims of India’s aggressive push towards nuclear energy By Mayank AggarwalJuly 15, 2019 The quest for uranium deposits to meet India’s nuclear power goals has now reached a tiger reserve in Telangana. An expert panel on forests of the ministry of environment, forest and climate change has recommended in-principle approval for a proposal by the central government’s department of atomic energy (DAE) for survey and exploration of uranium over 83 square kilometres in Telangana’s Amrabad Tiger Reserve. The proposal was considered by the forest advisory committee in its meeting on May 22. As per the minutes of the meeting, even though the committee noted that there are deficiencies in the proposal, it recommended the project for in-principle approval considering that the project is of “critical importance from [the] national perspective.” However, the forest advisory committee stipulated that the approval is subject to the submission of all required documents and said that after “receipt of the same, the complete proposal may be placed before the competent authority for approval.” Following this, the ministry of forest’s deputy inspector general of forests Naresh Kumar wrote to the Telangana government on June 19 requesting it to “submit the proposal along with verified relevant documents,” for identified boreholes for further consideration by the environment ministry. Sign up for the Quartz Daily Brief email Enter your email Sign me up Stay updated about Quartz products and events. Thanks for supporting our journalism! You’ve hit your monthly article limit. Become a member to help build the future of Quartz. Get unlimited access to Quartz on all devices. Unlock member-exclusive coverage, CEO interviews, member-only events, conference calls with our editors, and more. Start free trial Log in Membership will also get you: Exclusive videos that show you how the world is changing faster than ever before

Dr. Yusuf Hamied of Cipla was a prolific reader of medical journals, with an annual subscription budget that topped $150,000 …
ndia’s renewable energy industry is not as hot anymore, and jobs have become harder to come by.  Only about 12,000 new workers found employment at solar and wind projects in the financial year ended March 2019, compared with over 30,000 in the previous year, according to a report by the Council on Energy, Environment and Water (CEEW), a non-profit based in New Delhi, and the National Resources Defence Council (NRDC), another non-profit based in New York.  Chart from TheAtlas.com Sign up for the Quartz Obsession email Enter your email Sign me up  Stay updated about Quartz products and events. Thanks for supporting our journalism! You’ve hit your monthly article limit. Become a member to help build the future of Quartz. Get unlimited access to Quartz on all devices. Unlock member-exclusive coverage, CEO interviews, member-only events, conference calls with our editors, and more.  Start free trial Log in Membership will also get you:   Exclusive videos that show you how the world is changing
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ndia’s renewable energy industry is not as hot anymore, and jobs have become harder to come by. Only about 12,000 new workers found employment at solar and wind projects in the financial year ended March 2019, compared with over 30,000 in the previous year, according to a report by the Council on Energy, Environment and Water (CEEW), a non-profit based in New Delhi, and the National Resources Defence Council (NRDC), another non-profit based in New York. Chart from TheAtlas.com Sign up for the Quartz Obsession email Enter your email Sign me up Stay updated about Quartz products and events. Thanks for supporting our journalism! You’ve hit your monthly article limit. Become a member to help build the future of Quartz. Get unlimited access to Quartz on all devices. Unlock member-exclusive coverage, CEO interviews, member-only events, conference calls with our editors, and more. Start free trial Log in Membership will also get you: Exclusive videos that show you how the world is changing

NATIONAL INTEREST? Tigers in a southern reserve are victims of India’s aggressive push towards nuclear energy By Mayank AggarwalJuly 15, 2019 …
Board game devotees now have a game that trumps the luck factor and lets them experience the dark, unpredictable world of politics.  Shasn (Sanskrit for governance), which simulates elections, is being launched in India and the US today (July 16) by the Goa-based film studio Memesys Culture Lab.  For Zain Memon, the co-founder of Memesys, the launch marks the culmination of an idea that germinated in 2017, when his studio created the documentary An Insignificant Man, on the rise of the Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) politician and Delhi chief minister Arvind Kejriwal.  Sign up for the Quartz Obsession email Enter your email Sign me up  Stay updated about Quartz products and events. Thanks for supporting our journalism! You’ve hit your monthly article limit. Become a member to help build the future of Quartz. Get unlimited access to Quartz on all devices. Unlock member-exclusive coverage, CEO interviews, member-only events, conference calls with our editors, and more.  Start free trial Log in
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Board game devotees now have a game that trumps the luck factor and lets them experience the dark, unpredictable world of politics. Shasn (Sanskrit for governance), which simulates elections, is being launched in India and the US today (July 16) by the Goa-based film studio Memesys Culture Lab. For Zain Memon, the co-founder of Memesys, the launch marks the culmination of an idea that germinated in 2017, when his studio created the documentary An Insignificant Man, on the rise of the Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) politician and Delhi chief minister Arvind Kejriwal. Sign up for the Quartz Obsession email Enter your email Sign me up Stay updated about Quartz products and events. Thanks for supporting our journalism! You’ve hit your monthly article limit. Become a member to help build the future of Quartz. Get unlimited access to Quartz on all devices. Unlock member-exclusive coverage, CEO interviews, member-only events, conference calls with our editors, and more. Start free trial Log in

ndia’s renewable energy industry is not as hot anymore, and jobs have become harder to come by. Only about 12,000 …
A major issue that troubled the overseas operations of India’s airlines for months has been ironed out.  Today (July 16), the Pakistan Civil Aviation Authority announced it would reopen its airspace to all civilian traffic, ending restrictions imposed ever since a military standoff with India in February.  “With immediate effect, Pakistan airspace is open for all type of civilian traffic on published ATS (air traffic service) routes,” read the notice to airmen published by the authority on its website.  Sign up for the Quartz Daily Brief email Enter your email Sign me up  Stay updated about Quartz products and events. Thanks for supporting our journalism! You’ve hit your monthly article limit. Become a member to help build the future of Quartz. Get unlimited access to Quartz on all devices. Unlock member-exclusive coverage, CEO interviews, member-only events, conference calls with our editors, and more.  Start free trial Log in
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A major issue that troubled the overseas operations of India’s airlines for months has been ironed out. Today (July 16), the Pakistan Civil Aviation Authority announced it would reopen its airspace to all civilian traffic, ending restrictions imposed ever since a military standoff with India in February. “With immediate effect, Pakistan airspace is open for all type of civilian traffic on published ATS (air traffic service) routes,” read the notice to airmen published by the authority on its website. Sign up for the Quartz Daily Brief email Enter your email Sign me up Stay updated about Quartz products and events. Thanks for supporting our journalism! You’ve hit your monthly article limit. Become a member to help build the future of Quartz. Get unlimited access to Quartz on all devices. Unlock member-exclusive coverage, CEO interviews, member-only events, conference calls with our editors, and more. Start free trial Log in

Board game devotees now have a game that trumps the luck factor and lets them experience the dark, unpredictable world …