In the US, it’s not uncommon for a preschool teacher to make less than a tree trimmer. Childcare workers are often out-earned by janitors. The people caring for America’s youngest and most vulnerable are chronically underpaid and work in strenuous conditions, making it a struggle to recruit and train people for those jobs.  Bright Horizons, one of the biggest private childcare providers in the US, believes it has a solution. The company employs 20,000 teachers who care for about 100,000 children in more than 700 centers across the country. Last July, it rolled out an offer to pay upfront for its employees to get an online degree in early childhood education, expanding on an existing tuition assistance benefit program for staff.  As part of the program, educators working full-time in Bright Horizons childcare centers are eligible for upfront free tuition, including things like books, with no out-of-pocket costs. In exchange, participants commit to working at Bright Horizons for 18 months after getting their degree.  Sign up for the Quartz Obsession email Enter your email Sign me up  Stay updated about Quartz products and events. Thanks for supporting our journalism! You’ve hit your monthly article limit. Become a member to help build the future of Quartz. Get unlimited access to Quartz on all devices. Unlock member-exclusive coverage, CEO interviews, member-only events,
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In the US, it’s not uncommon for a preschool teacher to make less than a tree trimmer. Childcare workers are often out-earned by janitors. The people caring for America’s youngest and most vulnerable are chronically underpaid and work in strenuous conditions, making it a struggle to recruit and train people for those jobs. Bright Horizons, one of the biggest private childcare providers in the US, believes it has a solution. The company employs 20,000 teachers who care for about 100,000 children in more than 700 centers across the country. Last July, it rolled out an offer to pay upfront for its employees to get an online degree in early childhood education, expanding on an existing tuition assistance benefit program for staff. As part of the program, educators working full-time in Bright Horizons childcare centers are eligible for upfront free tuition, including things like books, with no out-of-pocket costs. In exchange, participants commit to working at Bright Horizons for 18 months after getting their degree. Sign up for the Quartz Obsession email Enter your email Sign me up Stay updated about Quartz products and events. Thanks for supporting our journalism! You’ve hit your monthly article limit. Become a member to help build the future of Quartz. Get unlimited access to Quartz on all devices. Unlock member-exclusive coverage, CEO interviews, member-only events,

In the last decade, psychological advisors have gone from an oddity to standard feature of major political campaigns. Back in …
Nestled in the mountains near the northern coastline of Taiwan, just outside of its capital, is a tower that, once full, will house the ashes of 400,000 people.  At 20 stories tall, the True Dragon Tower is the biggest columbarium in the world. It’s a striking manifestation of two problems plaguing countries all around Asia—a rapidly aging population, and a lack of space for the dead in urban centers.  That makes death big business in places like Taiwan, an island nation just slightly larger than the state of Maryland. True Dragon Tower is owned by Lung Yen Life Service, a Taiwan-listed company that is the third-largest funeral services operator in the world by market capitalization. After a decade of construction, the tower finally opened for business in 2002. Its soaring height was, in part, a response to the rapidly increasing rate of cremation in Taiwan. In the 1950s (pdf, link in Chinese), the Taiwanese government promoted it instead of ground burials in anticipation of a space crunch in the future, said the spokeswoman for Lung Yen. Well over 90% of people in Taiwan are now cremated, a rate similar to that of other developed places in Asia such as Japan and Hong Kong.  Sign up for the Quartz Obsession email Enter your email Sign me up  Stay updated about Quartz products and events. Thanks for supporting our journalism! You’ve hit your monthly article limit. Become a member to help build the future of Quartz. Get unlimited access to Quartz on all devices. Unlock member-exclusive coverage, CEO interviews, member-only events, conference calls with our editors, and more.  Start free trial Log in
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Nestled in the mountains near the northern coastline of Taiwan, just outside of its capital, is a tower that, once full, will house the ashes of 400,000 people. At 20 stories tall, the True Dragon Tower is the biggest columbarium in the world. It’s a striking manifestation of two problems plaguing countries all around Asia—a rapidly aging population, and a lack of space for the dead in urban centers. That makes death big business in places like Taiwan, an island nation just slightly larger than the state of Maryland. True Dragon Tower is owned by Lung Yen Life Service, a Taiwan-listed company that is the third-largest funeral services operator in the world by market capitalization. After a decade of construction, the tower finally opened for business in 2002. Its soaring height was, in part, a response to the rapidly increasing rate of cremation in Taiwan. In the 1950s (pdf, link in Chinese), the Taiwanese government promoted it instead of ground burials in anticipation of a space crunch in the future, said the spokeswoman for Lung Yen. Well over 90% of people in Taiwan are now cremated, a rate similar to that of other developed places in Asia such as Japan and Hong Kong. Sign up for the Quartz Obsession email Enter your email Sign me up Stay updated about Quartz products and events. Thanks for supporting our journalism! You’ve hit your monthly article limit. Become a member to help build the future of Quartz. Get unlimited access to Quartz on all devices. Unlock member-exclusive coverage, CEO interviews, member-only events, conference calls with our editors, and more. Start free trial Log in

As soon as Barbara Boswell began reading the journal article, the associate professor of English at the University of Cape …
The heart of Yoshino resides in a narrow, A-frame house along the banks of a mighty river. Yoshino Cedar House is an extraordinary, community-run Airbnb that has drawn international visitors to the remote village in Nara, Japan since it opened in 2017. By virtue of its architecture and management, the guest house also serves as the de facto headquarters for the beleaguered town’s campaign for survival.  “They say that Yoshino is disappearing,” says Ryoko Satoda, a housewife who cooks meals for AirBnb guests. Sitting down after whipping up an artful breakfast plate in the house’s tiny kitchen, she explains that half of the town (pdf) has moved away since the wood industry began sharply declining in the 1980s. With only around 6,700 residents today, it’s a starkly different place from her youth, when the population was more than double.  Located about an hour’s drive east of Osaka, Yoshino is an industrial town best known for two things: cherry blossoms and very tall, evenly-grained cedar. For one week every spring, tourists arrive in droves to gaze at 30,000 sakura trees that blanket the mountain ranges in various shades of pink. Considered among the best cherry blossom viewing spots in the entire country, Mt. Yoshino is also part of the Kii pilgrimage route, which was included in UNESCO’s World Heritage site list in 2004. For the rest of the year, the town is pretty much dead.  Sign up for the Quartz Daily Brief email Enter your email Sign me up  Stay updated about Quartz products and events. Thanks for supporting our journalism! You’ve hit your monthly article limit. Become a member to help build the future of Quartz. Get unlimited access to Quartz on all devices. Unlock member-exclusive coverage, CEO interviews, member-only events, conference calls with our editors, and more.
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The heart of Yoshino resides in a narrow, A-frame house along the banks of a mighty river. Yoshino Cedar House is an extraordinary, community-run Airbnb that has drawn international visitors to the remote village in Nara, Japan since it opened in 2017. By virtue of its architecture and management, the guest house also serves as the de facto headquarters for the beleaguered town’s campaign for survival. “They say that Yoshino is disappearing,” says Ryoko Satoda, a housewife who cooks meals for AirBnb guests. Sitting down after whipping up an artful breakfast plate in the house’s tiny kitchen, she explains that half of the town (pdf) has moved away since the wood industry began sharply declining in the 1980s. With only around 6,700 residents today, it’s a starkly different place from her youth, when the population was more than double. Located about an hour’s drive east of Osaka, Yoshino is an industrial town best known for two things: cherry blossoms and very tall, evenly-grained cedar. For one week every spring, tourists arrive in droves to gaze at 30,000 sakura trees that blanket the mountain ranges in various shades of pink. Considered among the best cherry blossom viewing spots in the entire country, Mt. Yoshino is also part of the Kii pilgrimage route, which was included in UNESCO’s World Heritage site list in 2004. For the rest of the year, the town is pretty much dead. Sign up for the Quartz Daily Brief email Enter your email Sign me up Stay updated about Quartz products and events. Thanks for supporting our journalism! You’ve hit your monthly article limit. Become a member to help build the future of Quartz. Get unlimited access to Quartz on all devices. Unlock member-exclusive coverage, CEO interviews, member-only events, conference calls with our editors, and more.

We’ve heard it all before—some new, groundbreaking technology is going to change the way we live and work. In fact, …